Jarrow Hall – Family Day Trip Idea

Following on from my post about the opening of Hive Coffee within Jarrow Hall I decided I needed to visit what was formerly known as Bede’s World. With most Geordie kids having previously been on school excursions, the Teen included, I felt like I had been missing out and was interested to find out more. With an Anglo-Saxon village, farm and museum dedicated to the Venerable Bede, we decided to make a day of it and also stop for lunch in the café so I could properly sample what they had to offer.It was £5 entry for myself, £3 for the Teen and Dinky (being under 5) was free. We also paid for a bag of animal feed to use at the farm. I felt this was reasonable value for money compared to other historic sites in the area.While the exhibition wasn’t really of interest to the Teen or Dinky, I enjoyed looking at the artefacts and learning more about the area. I was also fascinated to learn about the Jarrow Codex and I feel we take for granted – or perhaps don’t realise – how significant the North East was in the documenting of English history.

Once outside we took a stroll on the track around the farm to take in some views of the industrial side of the River Tyne. The weather was changeable during our visit but thankfully the ground wasn’t too damp. I allowed Dinky to stroll around rather than confining her to the buggy to expend some energy. I’ll admit it, I was hoping she’d exhaust herself for the car journey home but no such luck!As a vegan I’m obviously wary about visiting farms and the like, but I felt better hearing that this isn’t a working farm. Some of the animals have been rescued and are rare breeds.It was Dinky’s first encounter with animals other than the feline companions we share our home with and the odd doggy she’s met in her 13 months. She seemed very interested in the hens and spent time babbling to them.

There are also whattle and daub buildings in the village, one of which provided shelter when it started to drizzle. We didn’t stay indoors for too long, however, as Dinky was keen to get back outside and play.Lunch was welcome respite from her toddling, and I enjoyed a vegan friendly Leek & Potato Soup.The Teen opted for a Cheese Toastie, and for ‘dessert’ we shared a vegan brownie. You often find that cafes attached to visitor attractions such as this are expensive to capitalize on a captive audience. I was pleasantly surprised that our lunch, with drinks, cost just over £10. Hive Coffee Company is definitely somewhere to pop into, whether you are visiting Jarrow Hall or just happen to be in the vicinity.The last part of our day was spent in the play area next to the site. Dinky enjoyed her time on the swings, as you can tell!We also took a wander down to look round the Monastery ruins that are free to walk around beside St. Paul’s Church. The church has been used for prayer and worship for well over 1300 years, which is incredibly impressive.We had a lovely day trip out at the site and would encourage other families to pop down during the holidays. There are planned activities during Easter such as re-enactments and live history displays, talks about life in Anglo-Saxon times and Arts & Crafts. You can find out more here.

Thanks for reading,

Pip x

6 Comments

  1. Sam | North East Family Fun Travel Blog

    Looks canny 🙂

    The entry price is definitely good value.

    Reply
    1. Emma Phillips (Post author)

      It’s not very often you could go to a tourist attraction and have lunch and come out with change from a twenty quid note, that’s for sure!

      Reply
  2. The Hoopers

    Ahh I have lots of happy memories of Jarrow Hall and St paul’s, being brought up not too far. I def got to try the monks outfit on a school trip too. Will have to stop by and call into the cafe too. Looks brill and a great addition to the area.

    Reply
    1. Emma Phillips (Post author)

      There was definitely a need for a café like Hive in the area!

      Reply
  3. Alex alder

    This is a brilliant review thank you we wanted to come here but as a vegan family we too were dubious that it might be a working farm so thank you for clearing this up and we are now excited to go! Xx

    Reply
    1. Emma Phillips (Post author)

      It is something people who aren’t concerned by animal welfare may not consider, but pleased I could put your mind at rest. Definitely pop into the café, which has a resident vegan cooking up the dishes there 🙂

      Reply

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